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Friday, 27-Aug-2010 05:51 Email | Share | | Bookmark
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Saturday, 21-Aug-2010 19:01 Email | Share | | Bookmark
A Few Helpful Fishing Tips And Hints And Much More


<p>- Tip #97: Understand the Language <p>The more you know the language, or lingo, of fly fishing the more fun it will be as you fly fish with your friends and family. Some of the language that you should know includes: <ul>- Fly: The fly is light weight lure that is used to attract a variety of fish including trout and salmon. The most common fly is the mayfly.</ul> <ul>- Leader: The leader is attached to the end of fly line since the fly line is too thick to hold flies. The leader can be identified as a tapered clear piece of monofilament.</ul> <ul>- Plug: The plug is a lure that looks just like a bait fish. It will have one or more hooks that hang down from its body. You can use different plugs and jerk them around to look like a fish that has been injured.</ul> <ul>- Spinners: A spinner is a small oval-shaped blade that is attached to the end of a lure. A spinning hook will be trailing off the end of it.</ul> <ul>- Tippet: The tippet is a clear piece of monofilament. It is attached to the end of the leader so that the leader's end taper is preserved.</ul> <ul>- Woolly Bugger: The Woolly Bugger is a fly that has a very simple design with a long tail feather on the end. This fly is very popular among experienced fly fishers.</ul> <p>- Tip #35: Using a Hauling Technique <p>The hauling technique is when you increase the speed of your line by using the strength of your rod arm and your free hand arm. To achieve a good haul you need to pull down on the fly line at the position just below the stripper guide on your rod. The pull will increase the speed of the line as it moves outward. As you become more experienced you can try a double haul which is when you pull both the backward and the forward stroke with strength. <p>- Tip #12: Types of Fly Lines <p>Most of the lines that you'll use for fly fishing will be made of nylon monofilament. However, other lines are becoming just as popular such as lines that are (1) braided, (2) co-filament, or (3) fused. No matter what type of line you buy make
sure that it's a "premium" line. Premium lines are more durable and even than cheaper lines. You'll want to match the fishing line that you buy to the following criteria and conditions: <ul>- Strength: Strength is measured in the pounds of force that is needed to break the line. You'll find that most lines will break at higher weights than they are sold at.</ul> <ul>- Resistance to Abrasion: When you're fishing in areas where there are a lot of brush or rocks you'll want to use a line that won't break easily when it is constantly rubbed.</ul> <ul>- Line Diameter: The diameter of the line will affect the way the line is cast as well as how deep your lure will run. Diameter also has an affect on the visibility and stretching of the line. The thinner a line is the harder it will be for the bass to see it. Thinner lines will also give some bait, such as grubs, a more realistic flowing action. The one good thing about lines with a thicker diameter is that they are better able to withstand abrasion.</ul> <ul>- Stretch Lines: Stretch lines won't break as easily when they are being pulled by a fish. They are beneficial in letting you detect strikes as well as help you in setting hooks.</ul> <ul>- Line Stiffness: The stiffness of the line is related to its stretch. The stiffer the line is the harder it will be to cast. The advantage to having a stiff line is that is more sensitive than flexible lines.</ul> <ul>- Line visibility: In clear water it's important that your line is as invisible to the fish as possible. However, you'll want to have a line that is highly visible when your fishing lures are on a subtle strike, such as worms, grubs, and jigs. This is so that you can easily detect any movement on the line that may indicate a fish is biting.</ul> <p>- Tip #13: Pinching your Hooks <p>Take some time to pinch the barbs on the ends of your hooks. This will prevent fewer scratches. And keep in mind that a hook that is barbless is easier to remove that one that is barbed.<br/><a href='http://www.fis
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Saturday, 21-Aug-2010 17:19 Email | Share | | Bookmark
A Few Useful Fishing Info And Much More


<p>- Tip #31: Reach Casting <p>During a reach cast the fly, leader, and line are presented to your target area at a wide angle from the left or right side of the caster. This allows you a great deal of reach. Reach casting is very useful when you want to send a fly across a river or stream that has more than one speed of current. The reach cast lets you prevent your fly from being dragged down stream at a rate that is faster than the water where it is supposed to land. <p>- Tip #46: Carry a Wading Staff <p>When you're fishing in water that is rough or unfamiliar you might want to carry a wading staff to keep you stable and give you better footing. <p>- Tip #59: Fly Fishing for Salmon - Find a Good Hole <p>Make the effort to find a hole that has plenty of salmon in it. These types of holes can be fished all day. <p>- Tip #5: Best Bait Choices<p>Following is a list of some best bait choices as recommended by the experts: <ul>- Grubs: Grubs are small lures that are usually used to catch larger fish. Grubs are great for use in highland reservoirs where there is little cover for the fish. The grub is much like a bare jig head that has a soft plastic body to attach to the hook. You'll want to use them most often in clear water conditions.</ul> <ul>- Jigs are best used in water that is clear to murky and in water temperatures that are below 60 degrees. The jig is considered to be a "presentation" lure and the ideal way to use them is by making them look as alive as you can. The jig is essentially lead-weighted bait that has one hook. You'll want to add a trailer to the end of the hook for the best results.</ul> <ul>- Plastic worms: If you want to catch that trophy fish you'll probably want to use a plastic worm. This is because the plastic worm is one of the most effective lures for catching any type of big fish. Plastic worms have a thin and long profile with a lifelike action that attracts them instantly to bass. You'll have to learn how to use a plastic worm by touch, feel, and practice. The more
that you practice that better results you'll achieve. The one thing that you need to keep in mind is that the fish needs to see the worm before it will hit it. Therefore a plastic worm is best used in clear water.</ul> <ul>- Lure color: Choose lures that are all black or all white. A mix of black and red also works quite well. There will be the odd time when fluorescent colors, such as bright yellow or green, will work well but you'll need to experiment with this.</ul><br/><a href='http://www.fishingchair.org/folding-camping-chairs&#39;>Nice Folding Camping Chairs Site</a>


Thursday, 19-Aug-2010 18:28 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Some Selected Tips On Fishing And Much More


<p>- Tip #85: Using a Landing Net <p>If you want to use a landing net you need to make sure to hold the net on the stream bed and lift it up as the fish swims over top of it. Most fish will be lost after they make their final rush if they are faced with a landing net that is being held vertically out in front of them. After all, you can't expect the fish to want to swim right into it! And if you hold the net from behind and try to sweep up the fish all will be lost. All it takes is one touch of the fish's tail and it will be gone. <p>Fish are known for their acute sense of vision. They are able to see in all types of water conditions and can see equally well during the day and night. The reason for this great sight is that fish have eyes that are able to adjust naturally to different conditions of light. No matter what the color of the water is they are able to rely on their vision to guide them. At those times when the vision of the fish is restricted, its other senses will kick in. This means that no matter where you hold that landing net the fish will be able to see it or sense it. <p>- Tip #12: Types of Fly Lines <p>Most of the lines that you'll use for fly fishing will be made of nylon monofilament. However, other lines are becoming just as popular such as lines that are (1) braided, (2) co-filament, or (3) fused. No matter what type of line you buy make sure that it's a "premium" line. Premium lines are more durable and even than cheaper lines. You'll want to match the fishing line that you buy to the following criteria and conditions: <ul>- Strength: Strength is measured in the pounds of force that is needed to break the line. You'll find that most lines will break at higher weights than they are sold at.</ul> <ul>- Resistance to Abrasion: When you're fishing in areas where there are a lot of brush or rocks you'll want to use a line that won't break easily when it is constantly rubbed.</ul> <ul>- Line Diameter: The diameter of the line will affect the way the line is cast as well as
how deep your lure will run. Diameter also has an affect on the visibility and stretching of the line. The thinner a line is the harder it will be for the bass to see it. Thinner lines will also give some bait, such as grubs, a more realistic flowing action. The one good thing about lines with a thicker diameter is that they are better able to withstand abrasion.</ul> <ul>- Stretch Lines: Stretch lines won't break as easily when they are being pulled by a fish. They are beneficial in letting you detect strikes as well as help you in setting hooks.</ul> <ul>- Line Stiffness: The stiffness of the line is related to its stretch. The stiffer the line is the harder it will be to cast. The advantage to having a stiff line is that is more sensitive than flexible lines.</ul> <ul>- Line visibility: In clear water it's important that your line is as invisible to the fish as possible. However, you'll want to have a line that is highly visible when your fishing lures are on a subtle strike, such as worms, grubs, and jigs. This is so that you can easily detect any movement on the line that may indicate a fish is biting.</ul> <p>- Tip #101: Where to Find Oxygenated Water <p>The following areas are known to have good supplies of oxygen and therefore are great for fly fishing: <ul>- Creek mouths. There is a constant flow of water here that will have high levels of oxygen.</ul> <ul>- Rivers. Again, there will be the constant flow of water present in most rivers.</ul> <ul>- Areas of vegetation. Aquatic plants need a steady supply of oxygen to keep them alive and thriving.</ul> <ul>- In deep water. Deeper water is usually colder than higher water. Therefore there will be a better supply of oxygen.</ul> <ul>- Near power plants. There will be a continuous discharge of oxygenic water near power plants.</ul> <ul>- Near tree and log areas. Oxygen is present in treed areas because porous wood will hold oxygen.</ul> <p>- Tip #33: Shooting Line Casting <p>You'll want to use this type of cast when you want to create a
cast that extends out more line. To accomplish the shooting line cast, for either the forward or the backward cast, you need to use more power than you did when you cast the line as far as you did the first time.<br/><a href='http://www.fishingchair.org/folding-camping-chairs&#39;>Neat Folding Camping Chairs Site</a>


Friday, 26-Mar-2010 00:41 Email | Share | | Bookmark
A Few Essential Tips On Fishing For You


<p>- Tip #3: Holding your Rod Effectively<p>It's important that you learn to hold your rod effectively under any fishing conditions. You want to make sure that you maintain good control at all times without gripping too hard. You can adjust the power of your hold when you're in the middle of a cast. This will allow you to minimize the vibrations of each movement. With just a bit of practice you'll be able to increase the tightness at the same as you learn to relax your grip. <p>- Tip #83: Fishing Upstream <p>A basic concept of fly fishing is that a hooked fish isn't really caught until you have it up on the bank. If you want to land more fish the one thing that you can do is try to hook more fish upstream instead of downstream. This way, your fly will have a better chance of getting into the jaw of the fish. Try to keep downstream of any fish that you've managed to hook; when the fish is downstream he is using less energy since the current of the water will be doing much of the work for the fish. <p>- Tip #44: Tackle Boxes <p>Tackle boxes: A tackle box is a necessity so that you can keep all your "stuff" with you in one organized place. Some of the things to keep in mind when you use a tackle box and want to avoid overfilling include: <ul>- Keep your worms and soft plastic bait in a small container away from your other lures. This will keep the soft plastic lures from creating a chemical reaction with the materials that other baits are made of.</ul> <ul>- Buy two or more small tackle boxes to hold certain categories of lures. For instance, buy one tackle box to hold your worms and another to hold your spinnerbaits.</ul> <ul>- Buy seasonal tackle boxes that you only use at certain times of year. In the spring you can have a tackle box that contains jigs, plastic worms, and minnow lures. And in the fall you can have a tackle box that is filled with fall lure, such as topwaters and crankbaits.</ul> <p>- Tip #64: Fly Fishing for Salmon - Learn to Fish Slowly <p>One of the big mistakes that beginner
fly fishers make is too fish for salmon too quickly. Although effective for trout fishing, salmon need to be fished with more patience. <p>- Tip #67: Fly Fishing for Trout - Dry Fly or Wet Fly? <p>Knowing what fly to use is quite simple when it comes to fishing for trout: use a dry fly if the trout are feeding on the surface and use a wet fly if they are feeding below the surface.<br/><a href='http://www.berkley-fishing.com/&#39;>Berkley Fishing</a>


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